Sunscreen in a bottle? Ditch it!

Sunscreen in a bottle? Ditch it!

The right sunscreen will never let you down, but the bottle it comes in might. Sunscreen bottles inevitably come with their own inconveniences, all of which make EezySun’s helpful packaging such a welcome relief.

Bulkiness

Sunscreen bottles take up space. When you carry one in your beach bag or stuff one into your suitcase it can feel as if you’re lugging around excess baggage. EezySun snap sachets, on the other hand, are about the size of a credit card. This means you can fit a few of them into your pocket, wallet, gym bag, briefcase, backpack or suitcase without any extra weight or bulkiness to worry you.

Messiness

Sometimes carelessness translates into not closing your bottle of sunscreen properly, or not opening or handling it carefully (the same goes for sunscreen tubes). This has messy consequences. But EezySun scores points for its easily openable packaging. Snap a sachet open, apply what’s inside (which is enough to cover your face, arms, legs and neck) and throw it in the bin. You don’t have to endure opening the same bottle again and again while the excess cream from last time congeals on the lid.

So, instead of spending money on a large tube of sunscreen, buy EezySun at Spar, Clicks and other retail stores. One snap sachet can be used in one go, takes up hardly any space wherever you take or place it, and is easy for anyone to handle. It’s a refreshingly convenient alternative.

Third Floor Tijger Park 2
Willie Van Schoor Drive
Bellville, Cape Town 7530
South Africa
Tel: 021 914 0281

SPF 100 Sunscreens are worthless gimmicks

SPF 100 Sunscreens are worthless gimmicks

We are living in an age where we are becoming increasingly mindful of what we put on our skin. As such, you may have noticed a wave of super-high SPF sunscreens hitting the shelves over the last couple of years. These premium sunscreens promise every feature you’ll find on most labels: it’s oil-free, water-resistant, covers a broad spectrum, and free from dangerous ingredients. But the standout spec is that it offers an SPF rating of 100 and more. These sunscreens typically cost more,and because price equals quality, it’s logical for consumers to assume that an SPF 100 is twice as effective as a SPF 50.

However, experts have long since busted this myth: not only is the labelling misleading, but the product itself is unnecessary and not worth its price. Dermatologists agree users can get sufficient protection from a broad range sunscreen with an SPF 30 or 50 if they use the recommended measurement.

This means that if your If your skin would normally burn after 30 minutes of sun exposure, a SPF 30 sunscreen would allow you to enjoy the sunny outdoors without turning red for approximately 300 minutes (30 times longer). Aside from the time factor, SPF also represents the degree of protection from the amount of UVB exposure. Thus, SPF 30 filters out 97% of UVB, SPF 50 filters out 98%, and SPF 100 filters out 99%.

The danger with SPF 100 sunscreens, experts warn, is that they may lure consumers into a false sense of security that leaves them vulnerable to UV damage. They slap some on and feel confident enough to soak up the ultralight beams for as many hours as possible, without feeling the need to reapply. And they may think they don’t need to seek shade or cover their skin with clothing and a hat.

Additionally, sunscreens with higher values are often loaded with chemicals that can cause allergic reactions or damage the skin. They may also include SPF boosters that don’t always block UV radiation.

So, what’s the bottom line?

There’s not much of a difference in the level of protection that a SPF 100 and SPF 50+ provide. In fact, the US FDA in 2011 called for legislation that would ban products marketing itself as SPF 50+ because of lack of evidence showing SPF values higher than 50 provide superior protection than products with SPF values of 50.

The American Academy of Dermatology recommends that everyone put on a sunscreen with an SPF 30 every day, and an SPF50 before participating in outdoor activities. A fresh coating needs to be applied every two hours or after swimming or sweating, using the recommended amount (to fully cover your body, you’d need about a shot glass’ worth of sunscreen).

Third Floor Tijger Park 2
Willie Van Schoor Drive
Bellville, Cape Town 7530
South Africa
Tel: 021 914 0281

It’s radiation, not heat that causes sunburn!

It’s radiation, not heat that causes sunburn!

The sun provides us with light and heat, but what many of us don’t know, or often forget, is that it also emits radiation, and overexposure to radiation is what causes sunburn. While it’s not difficult to see why many of us believe our skin burns due to lengthy exposure to the sun on hot days, heat has nothing to do with the red, sore, sunburnt skin that many South Africans have come to know.

Radiation is received in three forms; infrared, visible and ultraviolet (UV). UV, specifically UVB, is the form of radiation that provides no heat, but causes harm to human skin in the form or redness and pain. This means that even on cloudy, cool days, up to 80% of UV rays can still penetrate the clouds and cause damage to your skin. While it can be tough to disconnect heat from sunburn, (as we can physically feel our skin burning on extremely hot days) the burning sensation we feel in fact comes from infrared radiation, which does not cause sunburn.

This means that we should, in fact, take note of the UV index and not just the temperature to determine whether our chances of getting sunburnt are high or not. According to Weather SA the UV index predicts UV intensity levels on a scale of  0 – 10+, and the index can be followed as below:

3 – 4 – Low: A hat and sunscreen is recommended.

5 – 6 – Moderate: A hat, sunscreen and remaining under shade is recommended.

7 – 9 – High: Together with the recommendations above, it is advised to stay in the shade between 10:00 and 16:00.

10+ –  Very High: Together with the precautions above, it is advised to stay indoors or in the shade between 07:00 and 17:00.

So the next time the clouds roll in and the temperature drops slightly, check the UV index on your local weather channel to see whether your chances of sunburn are higher or lower on any given day. Keep a sachet or two of EezySun sunscreen in your bag or wallet, and you can make sure your skin is always protected from those harmful UVB rays.

Third Floor Tijger Park 2
Willie Van Schoor Drive
Bellville, Cape Town 7530
South Africa
Tel: 021 914 0281

A shocking number of sunscreens don’t meet SPF claims

A shocking number of sunscreens don’t meet SPF claims

As exciting as planning a trip can be, many people don’t love the idea of packing. There are people for whom packing is merely throwing a few items in a bag at the last minute and rush off to catch their taxi to the airport. In reality, packing can be a real chore. It is often time spent deciding which of your favorite pairs of jeans to bring, episodes of unpacking and repacking, which usually ends with someone sitting on a suitcase, so you can squeeze in that neck pillow. And instead of enjoying the breathtaking views and fresh air of a mountain hike or the sun and surf at an island resort, you find yourself dragging a giant suitcase behind you on a sandy beach or rocky trail.

Like most things in life, packing is an art. We’re here to show you can skillfully downsize your luggage, so you can jet off to whichever destination a few pounds lighter.

Start with a small bag

When shopping for luggage, pass over oversized suitcases, as these will likely tempt you to drag your entire wardrobe with you. Rather opt for a carry-on bag or a smaller hard-sized suitcase that will prevent you from cramming in nice to haves. Your options will be limited, and you will have no other choice than to pack only the essentials.

Wear your heaviest clothing

It’s easier to pack light during the summer when you’ll mostly need clothing made from weightless fabric such as T-shirts, shorts and dresses. However, when travelling during the winter months on a cold evening, wear your heaviest clothing like jackets and trousers, and layer up if possible.

Pack travel friendly toiletries

The best way to travel with your beauty and skincare essentials is to buy the the mini-me versions of your favorite products. For example, soap facial cleansers and sunscreen packets are much more convenient to carry around than their bottled counterparts and will prevent spills in your bag. Also, look for multi-use products such as two-in-one shampoo and conditioners, and hair and body wash.

Be selective about technology

Technology can add quite a few pounds to your baggage weight and should therefore require some consideration. Do you really need a selfie stick when you can ask someone to take a snap of you? Is it necessary to bring your Canon when your smartphone can take just as good quality photos? Why do I need a laptop when my tablet can serve the same function?

Leave at home the things you can find at a hotel

Chargers, towels, bathrobes, soap, hair dryer, razors – most hotels offer some nifty freebies to guests so, if possible, call your hotel ahead and enquire which items come complimentary to your stay. Then ditch the stuff you don’t really need to pack.

Of course, no two travelers are the same and your packing really depends on where you’re going, how long you will stay, the weather and the type of activities you’ll be partaking in, however, these tips should get you started as a more effective packer.