A guide to reading the UV Index

A guide to reading the UV Index

Most weather reports include an update on the UV Index, but how many of us know what the UV Index actually means or how to interpret it? The UV Index is in fact an extremely important weather-related factor to consider, and can help prevent you from getting burnt.

The ultraviolet index, or UV Index as most of us know it, is, according to Verywell Health, a scale relating to the intensity of ultraviolet radiation from the sun. As IOL explains, Ultraviolet wavelengths of sunlight are comprised of UVB and UVA rays, both of which lead to the damage of skin cells and are thought to cause skin cancer. UVB is the cause of sunburn, while UVA contributes to premature skin aging.

The scale comprises several levels of intensity, going from 1 to 11+. These levels are grouped according to their intensity, and each group is represented by a specific colour.

Index Number Level of Intensity Colour Code

1 to 2 Low Green

3 to 5 Moderate Yellow

6 to 7 High Orange

8 to 10 Very High Red

11+ Extreme Violet

A lot of factors can contribute to the scale of the UV Index. These include the season (the index is at its highest during spring and summer), the time of day, ozone levels, cloud cover, altitude and earth surface characteristics such as snow, water and sand, each of which reflects a certain percentage of UV radiation.

The UV Index is a useful tool that will remind you always to protect yourself against the sun. It’s a constant necessity, which is why you should carry EezySun’s small and easy-to-use sunscreen snap sachets with you wherever you go. They’re available at leading Clicks and Spar stores nationwide.

Third Floor Tijger Park 2
Willie Van Schoor Drive
Bellville, Cape Town 7530
South Africa
Tel: 021 914 0281

Health experts say there’s no such thing as a safe tan

Health experts say there’s no such thing as a safe tan

When faced with the choice between soaking up the rays at the beach, hitting the sunbed at the salon, or using a self-tanning spray at home – few would doubt that the first option is more likely to contribute to sunburn and skin cancer. But, dermatologists agree that there is in fact no safe way when it comes to tanning, and all forms of skin darkening — whether natural or artificial — can present health risks in the long run.

That bronze glow may seem attractive and healthy now, but that might not be the case a few years from now when the effects of long-term exposure kick in. Moreover, it’s a myth that a sun tan helps prevent skin cancer. A tan is actually a sign of damaged skin no matter it’s source. That being said, previous studies discovered that radiation from a solarium is in fact ten times more dangerous than the midday sun.

Cancer Research UK claims that using tanning devices before the age of 35 increases one’s risk of malignant melanoma, the most life-threatening form of skin cancer, by 75 per cent. Additionally, research, published in the British Medical Journal, suggests that people who have ever used a sunbed were 20% more likely to develop melanoma, a risk which increased with sun exposure and sun sensitivity.

Also, don’t be fooled into thinking that slathering on a bronzer is completely safe. According to some medical experts, tanning sprays and lotions may cause genetic alterations and DNA damage due to an active chemical called dihydroxyacetone. 

For those looking to catch a dose of Vitamin D but without the risk of skin damage, Healthy Magazine recommends that you spread your tanning sessions over a couple of weeks instead of baking in the sun all day, spend no more than 20 minutes outside, avoid tanning between 11am and 3pm, and use a broad spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. 

Stock up on EezySun’s convenient, quality sunscreen snap sachets, available at Clicks and Spar, and arm yourself with the best defense against sunburn whenever you decide to spend some time in the sun.

Third Floor Tijger Park 2
Willie Van Schoor Drive
Bellville, Cape Town 7530
South Africa
Tel: 021 914 0281

Why you should apply sunscreen after exercise

Why you should apply sunscreen after exercise

Sunscreen is an everyday necessity. We step outdoors on a regular basis, and are therefore in constant need of sun protection. That’s why we must always carry sunscreen with us, especially given that its effects wear off after only a couple of hours. But time is not the only factor we must consider when it comes to reapplying sunscreen. Our outdoor activity is important to consider as well. 

Take exercise for example. It is as much an excellent lifestyle choice as the constant use of sunscreen, but the former can complicate the latter. When you’re planning to go for a run, a bike ride, an outdoor yoga session, a friendly soccer or rugby match, or even a workout at an outdoor gym facility, you need to remember to take your sunscreen with you, and there’s a very simple reason why.

When you work out you sweat, and sweat can easily wash away sunscreen. Constantly wiping yourself with a sweat towel won’t help matters much either. This is why it’s wise to have sunscreen with you. Once you’ve finished your workout and taken your shower, just reapply your sunscreen to areas of your body that will be exposed to sunlight and you’ll be good to go.

Sunscreen might, however, not be the first thing you think of when getting ready for your outdoor exercise session. You might also feel it’s an unnecessary burden when you consider everything else you have to pack, such as your towel and water bottle.

That’s where EezySun sunscreen snap sachets come in. They’re so small, light and compact that you can fit a number of them into your pocket, and that way you’ll always have them on hand. Buy them at leading Clicks and Spar stores nationwide.

Third Floor Tijger Park 2
Willie Van Schoor Drive
Bellville, Cape Town 7530
South Africa
Tel: 021 914 0281

How to find a sunscreen that won’t cause a breakout

How to find a sunscreen that won’t cause a breakout

When you have temperamental skin, finding a sunscreen that won’t cause your skin to break out is often a challenge. But you really can’t ditch sun protection, can you? Here are three things to look out for when choosing a sunscreen that won’t irritate your skin.

Firstly, you should look for a sunscreen product that’s non-oily and noncomedogenic. What this means is that the product has no ingredients that are known to cause pore blockages and breakouts. While there is never a guarantee that a sunscreen won’t cause your skin to break out, it does mean it’s less likely to, making it a better option. 

Secondly, you should avoid using a sunscreen that is specifically for your body, on your face. Apart from being too thick, these sunscreens can be heavy and greasy, making them more likely to contribute to breakouts.

And lastly, you want to stay away from sunscreens that contain oxybenzone and Para-Aminobenzoic Acid (PABA), as these products are chemical based, and more likely to irritate your skin. You should opt for a mineral based and non-oily product, like EezySun. Our non-oily formula removes the risk of skin and eye irritation making it safe for even the most sensitive of skin types. EezySun comes in easy to use sunscreen snap sachets that make application hassle and contamination-free. They are available for purchase at leading Clicks and Spar stores.

If you’re using acne treatment, remember that you can apply sunscreen too.

Third Floor Tijger Park 2
Willie Van Schoor Drive
Bellville, Cape Town 7530
South Africa
Tel: 021 914 0281